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Hi All, I'm sure as experienced managers you would love to share your thoughts. I'm a high S.  I took over managing a place that had no leadership.  All employees were able to do what they wanted when they wanted how they wanted.  Then I come in and staff think I'm making huge changes.  When in actuality I'm implementing rules that need to be followed.  For example you need to be at work on time, you have to put in vacation time when you are off from work, and various other simple company policies.  I haven't even gotten to the hard stuff yet. I don't have a problem making these changes becuase I know I have the policy to back me.  Yet it has turned a few people off.  I have had employees tell me this is now the worse place to now work since they can't do what they want.  I have had staff run to HR and say I yell at them at I don't care about them or talk nice to them.  All of which are flat out bogus.    And I struggle with conflict.   Any thoughts/suggestions? 

Sibshops's picture

Are you a high C as well? I ask because it appears that rules are being enforced just for rules sake. People > policy.

I would recommend some give and take, if someone is off work because of a doctor's appointment give them the chance to make it up later in the week. If they show up late to work, ask them to make up the time in another way.

Full disclosure: I'm a high S, but not a manager. My DISC is 5452. 

pucciot's picture

I looks like you are changing the working culture of your little area of the org.

This can be tough.

Change is hard and as a High S I'd expect you to understand that need to feel trust.

Yes, you are making huge changes.  Huge is in the eye of the beholder.

Many of your directs may also be High S

Make sure that when you talk with them that you address their emotions and concerns about the changes.

Slowly get them to learn that they can trust you when exceptions need to be made.

Do you have a clear policy about how and when they can ask or inform you about time off and lateness ?

Did you get thier input about the best way to make these requests ?

I'd reccomend that at the next staff meeting that you ask them for input about how time-off and lateness can be handled.

You could try to quietly and calmly steer away from any posistion that changes your overall stance on this, and you should be able to find a solution that is liked by most of the staff about how to inform you and/or ask about time-off and lateness.

That's my thought.

Good Luck

TJPuccio

G3's picture

MD -

Are you new to this company? Then you might want to consider the following two bits: a. Go Slow & b. Fit in, fit in, fit in. More tips in the 90 day new job podcasts. There are 5 of them. Here's a link to the overview: https://www.manager-tools.com/2012/05/90-day-new-job-plan-overview

Have you rolled out the trinity? The changes might become more palatable after you've built up relationships & good will.

Another idea: pre-wire your changes. This way the directs know they're coming. "Hey, look this is how things were before. I understand that. Things are going to be changing. This is how it is now. If you do x then the consequence will be y." Then be sure to follow through.

Just a few suggestions. Take what you like & leave the rest.