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I'm seeing the term behavior used frequently. Both on M-T and in management discussions. We use behavioral interviewing to attempt to find candidates with past behaviors that will predict future success with us...We are using the M-T definition of behavior when using the feedback model...We use core competencies in performance reviews to rate an employee on what successful behaviors they have had in areas that are important to the company.

And I guess that is where I'm having trouble. Mark's definition of behavior is something you can see, hear or how it is done. I can see when a behavior is successful but looking at giving feedback on the 8 core compentencies in our PR form I suddenly feel overwhelmed!

Some of the core competencies are more important to getting the job done than others...and being on time to work isn't one of the CCs. :-)

How do you integrate CC into your feedback? Is it a concern and you just rate them at the end of the year? Do you focus on areas that directly relate to job performance (which may not be related to the CC)?

Peter.westley's picture

lmots,

I suspect we're seeing a confusion between competancy and behaviour. I don't think they're the same thing. There's a reason getting to work on time is a behaviour, not a CC.

A CC might be "being available when the customer requires us". One behaviour that might support that CC would be getting to work on time.

Integrating CCs into your feedback means understanding the main behaviours needed to achieve those CCs. Then giving feedback on those behaviours (or lack of them).

If you can give a little more detail or some examples of your CCs, we might be able to help some more.

lmots's picture

Thanks for the response Peter. I was wavering between too much information and just enough. Looks like maybe I missed it altogether.

Most large companies I have worked at have been focusing reviews/and other people-related activities on what are called core competencies. These are some wise person's perspective on what a "fully functional" person would be like. The ones being used where I am now are...accountability, customer focus, decision making, ethics/integrity, initiative/action orientation, operational excellence, results focus/achievement orientation, and teamwork/team player.

You gave example of customer situation so I'll expand that one. Ideally at a mastery level one would meet these statements all the time:

Knows and meets all the expectations and requirements of internal and external customers. Knows his/her customers and can describe their expectations. Collects information and develops resources to address situations where customer needs are not being met. Manages customer expectations; gains their trust and respect. Works with management to resolve customer-related problems. Actively seeks customer feedback on quality of service he or she provides. Serves as a trusted advisor to clients and customers.

Something to strive for but maybe where I'm struggling is in the transition from be to do? For instance the last statement...serves as trusted advisor...When you are serving you are doing...but what specific action am I looking for? I can get my customers to trust me...but how can I convey that to a team member? Mark makes this so simple in the casts. :-)

Thanks for your thoughts.

Larry

regas14's picture

[quote="Peter.Westley"]
Integrating CCs into your feedback means understanding the main behaviours needed to achieve those CCs. Then giving feedback on those behaviours (or lack of them).
[/quote]

That hit the nail on the head if you ask me. I agree however that great managers and great organizations make that sound much simpler than it actually is. I'm interested to hear what other responses show up. For what it's worth, I'll offer my two cents.

In my opinion core competencies are achieved and sustained through organizing and activiating the strengths of individuals. The right people, in the right roles can make tremendous contributions to one or more of those competencies, but I think it's unlikely that a single person can make sustained, significant contributions to all of those.

If forced to evaluate individuals on the embodiment of the company's core competencies, I think I would first try to translate the corporate competencies to my group or team and what our contribution can be. From that, create an action plan for the team and then evaluate individuals based on their contribution to the action items applicable to their role on the team.

lmots's picture

When it comes down to it, I do know the behaviors that I need to provide feedback on...what I consider critical for getting the job done well.

Many of the "master-level" descriptions take some interpreting to relate them to the job we do and take some real stretching to apply to our duties. If I tried to give feedback on all of them, I would definitely drive myself crazy...but by reducing the focus to a short-list that maximizes a person's strengths and minimizes their weaknesses it becomes more manageable.

Good thoughts, both of you. Thank you!

Larry

Mark's picture

Peter's right.

AND... get ready...

Core competencies are a complete, utter, total waste of time that no managers understand very well, were foisted on us by HR and consulting companies to approach a world where everything was "connected" (too long, don't ask). They are an unhelpful artificial construct used to explain personnel issues and are usually poorly implemented due to lack of training, HR turnover, etc., etc.

Forget about them as much as you can without getting in trouble.

Mark

lmots's picture

As I have looked through the forums, Peter has had some solid advice. Hope he gets employed soon, he'll make somebody real happy he works for them!

Mark, I remembered your general comment about core competencies from one of the podcasts on performance reviews...I don't remember which one off hand ( all the podcasts are beginning to merge into a single training session, I have listened to them so much. ;-) not that I'm complaining!)

[quote="mahorstman"]
Core competencies are a complete, utter, total waste of time that no managers understand very well,...usually poorly implemented due to lack of training
Mark[/quote]

I suppose we wouldn't be needing Manager-Tools so badly if we got the training we needed from HR BEFORE we became managers. Since I've improved so many of the things I do based on your advice, maybe I won't get into too much trouble if I fudge the line on this one. :)

Larry

Mark's picture

NOW you're thinking. :wink:

Mark

PedroPalhoto's picture

To complement this thread on behaviour.

[url=http://www.quotationspage.com/quote/33101.html][i]What we think, or what we know, or what we believe is, in the end, of little consequence. The only consequence is what we do.[/i][/url] John Ruskin.

Saw this quote on Quotes of the Day and Manager Tools sprang to mind, so I decided to share. I believe Mark said something similar once, I'm not quite sure when.

Mark's picture

Pedro-

Thank you! I have struggled with many who talk about attitude (including me!), and often feel quite alone pitching the "behavior rules" mantra.

Thanks for sharing - I've printed this quote out, and am going to frame it in my office.

It's a privilege to serve you,

Mark

PedroPalhoto's picture

[quote="mahorstman"]Pedro-

Thank you! I have struggled with many who talk about attitude (including me!), and often feel quite alone pitching the "behavior rules" mantra.[/quote]

You're welcome, Mark.

It is ironic that in the end what we are really talking about is [i]having an attitude[/i] towards engaging in effective behaviour :roll:.

What have we learned from brainstorming? No [b]but[/b]s, use [b]and[/b]s. Well, I believe both attitude and behaviour approaches can be synergized effectively. No behaviour comes out of us if no spark is there to kindle it. The path from initial attitude to behaviour is what's refered to as of little importance.

[quote="mahorstman"]Thanks for sharing - I've printed this quote out, and am going to frame it in my office.[/quote]

It's a privilege to share ;).