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They have moved corporate offices and I have a new, undecorated office.

As a faithful follower of MT, I am searching for how to decorate the walls of this new office space to help create the professional and appropriate environment for this new space.  As a non-interior designer, I am seeking assistance in what others think or recommend.

jhack's picture

How about simply and neatly framed small poster versions of company advertisements or product marketing materials? 

They keep the walls from being bare, they're very professional, and  they age well, becoming artifacts of company history.  

[edited to add:  Marketing might have some "vintage" stuff that would be very nice to display.]

John Hack

RebeccaCameron's picture

Thanks for advice gyus. For me it's new, so you advice really helpfull

amlryan's picture

I have not posted my degrees or designations on my walls, but wonder what the general opinion on that is?

I must admit that my office is very bland, one framed poster from a Concours d'Elegance and print out of David Allen's advanced work flow diagram are all that take up space on my walls.

Looking forward to seeing further posts.

 

 

amlryan's picture

I have not posted my degrees or designations on my walls, but wonder what the general opinion on that is?

I must admit that my office is very bland, one framed poster from a Concours d'Elegance and print out of David Allen's advanced work flow diagram are all that take up space on my walls.

Looking forward to seeing further posts.

 

 

bug_girl's picture

I never actually took the time to frame my diplomas until I took a position with a new company...and noticed every single one of my new peers and bosses had their degrees conspicuously on display.  I got mine matted up and posted asap!

Now it's back in a box, since I don't think displaying it is a good fit for where I am now.

Short answer: it depends.

MsSunshine's picture

I'd do the following:

  1. See what other people who you admire, want respect from, etc. in the company do.  Our environment here is very relaxed and even the executive suites have personal pictures of kids, special mementos, etc.  No one has their degrees on the wall.  There is a lot of company memorabilia on people's bookshelves.  So, I'm in line with that.
  2. If other people are showing personal touches, think about what you'd like people to know you are interested in and show that.  I add some personal touches to make it in line with my likes.  My company encourages people to be creative and express their personalities in positive ways.  I think not having a sterile office that looks like it was put together by Marketing is something people expect here for anyone other than a junior level person.  I also find that these are great conversation starters with people who come into my office for meetings or my directs.  For example, the GM was a real sports fan and had some pictures around, banners, etc. from his favorite teams.  Some people have plants.  Some people have nice framed photos they took if they do photography.  I have some things on my wall and mementos from the other global offices that I've visited.  I pick up interesting things people can fiddle with while we talk and have them on my table.  Some people play with them all the time - releasing nerves I guess! 

I was a little surprised that people actually notice things in my office.  When I get a new thing to play with people who don't even play with them comment.  They also noticed when I changed some of the photos on the wall (I do some photography).

 

NOTE:  My previous company was absolutely nothing that wasn't a company thing except for maybe a few photos.  Blank walls.  Empty desks.  And every desk was a mass of unorganized papers, books, etc.  Maybe that's why I didn't feel I fit in so well! :^)

 

430jan's picture

I painted my office right away upon getting promoted (I work for my county government, so no wasted tax dollars here), then I propped up the pictures against the walls meaning to get them hung up...and that was a year ago. I guess it tells my staff that I'm plenty busy without interior decorating. Meanwhile I do manage to keep the chocolates stocked up on my desk to get plenty of staff traffic coming through.

I do remember a mention about this on a podcast (don't ask me which after 20 billion of them). Mark disapproved mightily of big efforts at interior decorating, mainly citing that this is showing your staff you have no life and will spend every waking minute at work. Point taken, however I do spend a lot of life at work and would prefer a few things around to remind me why I beat myself up like this every day.

mdave's picture

Another idea ... find out if there is a dust-gathering collection of old framed pictures, product posters, or other company memorabilia in a closet somewhere (a long standing resourceful admin would know). You get the benefit of being sensitive to and respectful of the company  and it's (storied?) past.

agaerthofner's picture

It may seem like a waste of money to you, but hire an interior designer/decorator. They will most likely charge a nominal fee. However, when it's done, you'll be glad you did.

terrih's picture

Plants are good... unless you have a brown thumb, of course. LOL

12string's picture

 I put up a picture of a guillotine...oddly enough nobody bothers me...ever  (j/k)

~12string~

dunnmark's picture

I never used to spend a lot of time thinking about this, until a colleague who I greatly respect suggested I use feng shui just after I'd moved into my office near hers. Not that I claim any spiritual powers as a result of doing it, however, it DEFINITELY created a more soothing environment and (coincidently I think) we enjoyed some outstanding business results soon after making the changes! Besides all that, the general principles just make good sense.

Not for everyone, but you can get started at the following links:

http://www.hidden-wealth-keys.com/office-feng-shui.html

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UvS3osnwHf4

http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/using-feng-shui-at-work-private-offices-and-cubicl.html