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Hello,

Has anyone else had this amusing scenario?:

I was talking to a work acquaintance that I believe is primarily I and secondarily D. I think I'm more of a C (haven't taken the profile) but made a conscious effort to inflect my voice more, make arm movement outside my body, and basically bring myself closer to his I level. (Ha! I wanted to see him "I to I." *groan*).

Meanwhile, I noticed him bring his arms in closer, speak in more reserved tones, and try to bring himself closer to a C.

We met somewhere in the middle, and stayed there ... surprisingly comfortably, for me anyway.

I'm pretty new to MT and am loving the podcasts. I'm also loving practicing the tools at work. I've been trying to notice the DISC profiles (at least the high letter) of people and change my behavior to communicate better with them. I don't consider myself good at this (yet) by any means, but the scenario I described really amused the heck out of me.

Thanks,
BJ

FlatFeeKing's picture

Thanks for the comment, I think you may have just inspired me to take the disc profile test.

lazerus's picture

This happens ALL the time to me. The high C profile is less "off-the-cuff", more thoughtful, wants the data, etc. Personally, I am trying to develop more D and i behavior at work because it seems to me that those behaviors are more effective for management. In our business I get the opportunity to practice A LOT, many colleagues and coworkers are D or i.

DiSC works. You can get it on the MT website. By doing your own profile you can get a good grip on your own style and (bonus!) the other styles you are not as familiar with. It's an absolutely fantastic tool.

I want to start a group. High Cs Unite! None of us would do it, though, there would have to be some measurable goal with a flowchart. THe whole socializing part would just be such a waste of valuable time. :wink:

BJ_Marshall's picture

FlatFeeKing:

I read your post and thought, "Gee - I should actually take the profile instead of guessing what I am." Turns out I'm not as much C as I thought, which goes to show how much room I have to grow in applying the DISC model.

Thanks for giving me the kick-in-the-pants (even if it was unintentional) to take the profile.

Cheers!
BJ

WillDuke's picture

BJ - yeah, that's a lot of D you have there. :)

I want to point out that you deserve to get lots of credit for your efforts. You wanted to do a better job. You went and found information. You practiced it. You got more information. Kudos to you for jumping in!

dfbfloyd's picture

BJ -

That's interesting that you were different that what you thought. It looks like there's still a lot of C. I really enjoy trying to read people. Some are more difficult than others, especially when it comes to distinguishing C's from S's. At least it is for me. I can typically tell if someone is a D in a matter of seconds.

I'm a high C so sometimes it's tough for me to adapt. I tend to explain every detail and D's just want tidbits of what they need. And they want it fast! This is fine and I'm typically able to scale back. However, I ran into a person the other day that really needed details and wasn't interested in hearing them. We tried to work through a project and it took 3-4 times as long as it would've if the person could've taken 5 minutes to understand the software system we were using. Needless to say it was my fault for not explaining more. It still made me laugh at the end of the day. Mostly because I knew the person wasn't dwelling on it as I'm sure they were running to the next project.