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In th coaching model do you go into how to clarify expecatations?

Please take a look at this example from a customer service manager I work with. [u][b]Do think this manager is doing a good job clarifying expectations?[/b][/u] He sent this email as his expecations regarding acting "professional" with customers over the phone. This is a high-tech call center.

"I want to share with you some of the most important fundamental things to remember when you are in contact with customers over the phone:

The greeting should include:
"Good Morning/afternoon/evening and Thank you for calling..."
- My name is "x"
- How may I help you?

We need to speak slowly so customers know who they are dealing with.
When you become emotional, please refrain from speaking too fast and swearing is a no-no. When dealing with customers, it is almost unforgivable to take anything “negative” customer said personally.

Be a good listener. Please refrain from interrupting while the customers are talking."

Mark's picture

Jon-

I'm not sure I understand your question. Do I think this is a good start for this manager? Yes, there are some good details there, and were I working for him, the expectations seem clear [i]in these behavior areas.[/i] I don't yet know what my goals are, but so far as it goes, it's better than, "I'll know it when I hear it."

And, to be clear, I have extensive call center experience - my firm has trained tens of thousands of call center reps.

But I don't understand the tie in to the coaching model...

Mark

US101's picture

I guess the question is wouldn't the manager use the coaching model? Or is this really more feedback? Or is it really developing his team? I'm making this complicated.

This manager just started a few weeks ago. He has several years experience managing a call center. He's got a team of very technically competent technical service engineers, but they need to improve they're communication skills.

The goals are:
1. increase professional customer service
2. decrease un-professional customer service
3. clear speaking skills
4. improved listening