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I have been managing one of our department's programs while the usual manager is on a one-year leave. When the year is over, what should I include in my report?

I feel the program could be managed more actively. My colleague prefers steady state and feels she has no more time to spend on it than she's already spending.

Note, this is NOT in a business environment, it is an academic program in a university.

My ideas so far:
- number and names of courses and instructors
- number of students
- student performance numbers
- time usage (mine & my temp's)
- income & expenses
- changes I've made to procedures and key documents
- comments and recommendations

My concerns:
- my colleague does not normally write a report on the program
- I have not been asked to produce a report
- I don't want to look like I'm trying to show up my colleague
- I want the program to improve

Thanks for your ideas everyone!

lmoorhead's picture

It sounds like you're thinking of a report for a broader audience; but I would recommend putting something together for your returning colleague. I suggest listening to the podcast "How to Resign" http://www.manager-tools.com/2006/07/how-to-resign-part-1-of-3/

It offers some great suggestions not just for resignation but for transitioning out of any role, even if you won't go far.

tlhausmann's picture

[quote="rthibode"] I feel the program could be managed more actively. My colleague prefers steady state and feels she has no more time to spend on it than she's already spending. Note, this is NOT in a business environment, it is an academic program in a university. ![/quote]

Perhaps with the year away she has had an opportuinity to recharge.

[quote="rthibode"]

My ideas so far: [...] [/quote]

That sounds a *lot* like a briefing book. To me, it seems like a great idea to bring a colleague up to speed on the program after being out for a year. If, for no other reason, your briefing book clearly documents the state of the program should external grants become available or fundraising personnel desire to learn more about the program; (because the right donor might come along with an "interest" in the success of the program!)

[quote="rthibode"]
My concerns:
- my colleague does not normally write a report on the program
- I have not been asked to produce a report
- I don't want to look like I'm trying to show up my colleague
- I want the program to improve [/quote]

You cannot control your colleague's actions or feelings and your heart is in the right place. I may be wrong, but from my perspective assembling the report/briefing book (and you being an MT manager!) you're in a better position to direct similar programs the next time your institution has a need for skilled leadership.

rthibode's picture

Thank you both for your insights.

Lisa, I never would have thought of checking the resignation podcast, what a great idea!

tlhausmann, thanks for the mention of fundraising, that is definitely an angle I hadn't thought of and it's very relevant to this particular program.