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I am expecting an offer from two separate companies next week. I think that they would be great opportunities but there are two other positions that have a slightly slower hiring process. How do I proceed, not knowing if one of the latter two will pan out?

Also, What is the best way to follow up with a hiring manager (VP) that I have interviewed with, sent a handwritten note to and followed up once more via email? I was told by an internal source that they are interested in me but specifically hiring me isn't the #1 thing on their plate's as of today. I want to follow up with her regularly but don't want to sound desperate. I want to sound like I want the job (yes, I closed in the interview as well as my follow-up note) and want her to know that I am passionate about getting it.

Thanks,

DW

jhack's picture

The interview series covers this issue specifically and in great detail.

The gist of it is: don't try to be clever. When you have an offer, ask for a week to respond, then call the folks who have not given you an offer and tell them you have one from someone else.

If they really want you, they'll get you an offer. If not, they won't, and you'll be able to take the best of the offers in hand.

John

PS: Congratulations!

HMac's picture

jhack nailed it - go back to the interview series again: the advice is really good because it anticipates the natural desire to try to line up all your offers at the same time so you can pick and choose among them.

Regarding your second question (about communicating with the hiring manager VP). There's only so much you can do. It's like calling back when you're selling - and yahtzee, with your experience you should relate to this - I was taught you only call back if you have some piece of news to share. If I understand your circumstances here, you may well have news to share next week: that you've received offers from other companies.

Good luck!

thecoach's picture

Good on ya! Two offers in this market is quite an accomplishment. As a job search coach, the first task I set client on is to create a go/no-go list. This helps to include and exclude opportunities without wasting anyone's time. Perhaps a review of the various offers and prospective offers will help you decide if waiting is warranted. As a general rule, taking a job based only on compensation does not insure either longevity or success. Get to the nitty gritty of each opportunity and imagine yourself in each job one year from now when the excitement wears off.
As for contact...You have nothing to lose by contacting each person from whom you would like an offer to share your news, just don't make it an ultimatum. "I would like to include your company as I review my options. Does that work with your time frame?"
In general, however, too much contact takes you out of the running. Golden rule for contact: Contact as you would like to be contacted if you were the hiring authority. For more detail, my book, Job Search Debugged may be of interest. www.jobsearchdebugged.com

Nevergiveup's picture

I don't subscribe to the Interview series.... so I'm looking at what jhack is saying in this thread to gather what it says...

"When you have an offer, ask for a week to respond, then call the folks who have not given you an offer and tell them you have one from someone else.

If they really want you, they'll get you an offer. If not, they won't, and you'll be able to take the best of the offers in hand."

 

However in the manager tools lession called - How not to accept an offer - playing two offers off each other

Inside the shownotes, it says...

"So we hope that by calling the second company and telling them we got an offer, we'll speed up their process, or cause them to make an instant offer. And in 99% of cases that doesn't happen. You're just not that special, however they've made you feel during the interview process. When you try to negotiate, you're taking goodwill off the table. Any enthusiasm and passion the hiring manager thought you had for the company and this role during the interview process is discounted by the position you put her in by negotiating."

Both techniques have it's merits, but are qute different.  WHat do you guys think I should do, because I have a situation just like this.  

Nevergiveup's picture

In a few days time, I am probably going to be offered the job in company A.  Key word here being probably.  I think this is going to be the case because the hiring manager wants to meet me for a quick chat, and all the salary slips/reference calls etc. have been completed.  Company A's role is awesome.

Company B (who has a slightly more awesome) opportunity is going to update me around that time also.  However, since i THINK company A is going to offer me in a few days time, should I ask company B to see if they can speed it up?  Or will it be erasing goodwill?