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MT'ers,

I would love some of your thoughts & recommendations regarding how to increase the likelihood that a potential hiring manager/employer will read my professional blog.  I consider my blog to be a critical asset of mine in helping to substantiate my domain expertise & thought-leadership - and thus serve as a major component of my job search.

To-date, I include the link to my blog in:

  • All of my email signatures in emails sent to hiring mgrs & potential employers
  • My resume, LinkedIn profile, and even in my cover letters when relevant

Despite these different "touch pts" of distribution, only about 1 in 30 hiring mgrs actually take a look at my blog, which I've found to be rather surprising, as I view it as a key way for hiring managers to reduce their hiring risk. 

I would love to hear your thoughts, suggestions, ideas as to how I can increase my "conversion rate", as I really think my blog could go a long way given all of the positive feedback I've received from professional peers regarding it.

Thank you in advance for all of your great insights, feedback, and recommendations!

Regards,

-Drucker/1900

bffranklin's picture

Drucker,

As a hiring manager, I don't care about your blog.  I know plenty of folks who are passionate about topics they find interesting after work.  I want to know if you can deliver above and beyond on the tasks assigned to you, not what you want to work on.  If anything, I'm just checking your blog to make sure it isn't full of offensive bigotry or other red flags.

asteriskrntt1's picture

... people would be sharing your blog all over the place.  I never "find" blogs.  My friends refer me to them.  If my friends are interested, I am likely interested.  So basically I agree with Mr. Franklin above. 

As a hiring manager, I have never heard anyone say "what tipped the scales for me on this hire was his blog".  You are thinking from a recruitee standpoint.  You need to think from the hiring manager's standpoint.

This looks like a good time to rant about the over-reliance on social media versus good old leg work and relationships.  People put up websites and urls and blogs and assume this builds relationships.  And they do to a small degree.  However, the most effective is still a phone call or a face to face meeting and building a personal relationship, not a virtual one.  Just my 2 cents.

 

Drucker1900's picture

Thanks so much for the feedback - coming from a hiring manager, I find it specifically interesting.    

My only thought is that if the hiring process is largely about minimizing risk (of hiring the wrong person), it would seem to me that gaining access to the thoughts & expertise of a top candidate via his/her blog could be very helpful.

(As a hiring manager myself, I have always been intrigued by any strong candidates who also have relevant blogs that further support my feelings about their capabilities)

Thanks again for your thoughts!

D/1900

bug_girl's picture

Granted, I am in a science-related field, so my opinion might not be useful to you.

However--

I would look at the blog *IF* the person seemed like a good candidate, and I would look to see what sort of person I might be considering hiring. I'd be looking mostly for:

--can you write a grammatically correct sentence?

--do you appear to reflect the values of my organization, or at least not be in opposition to it?

--are there any major red flags (racism, naughty photos, etc.)?

In other words, I'd be more likely to use information on your blog in making a decision NOT to hire you.

So...where's the link to your blog? ;p

TomW's picture

Find it: not too likely.

Read it? Even less likely. You're talking about people who barely have time to read allthe resumes that they get. What makes you think they will take the time to read what you think?

As 144 points out, expect Murphy's law to take effect. The day you make a post full of typos or after having a bad day and saying something you shouldn't will be the day the recruiter reads it. And it will be the only day.

TomW's picture

Find it: not too likely.

Read it? Even less likely. You're talking about people who barely have time to read allthe resumes that they get. What makes you think they will take the time to read what you think?

As 144 points out, expect Murphy's law to take effect. The day you make a post full of typos or after having a bad day and saying something you shouldn't will be the day the recruiter reads it. And it will be the only day.

Drucker1900's picture

Folks,

Thank you so much for the great feedback - I deeply appreciate your taking the time to share your thoughts.

I want to make a quick point of clarification that I should have made in my original post -- I totally understand that no hiring manager, recruiter or HR person has time to look at random candidates' blogs when sifting through 20 or 50 or 100+ apps.

The scenario that I meant to ask about is in regards to a candidate whom the hiring manager has met with in person and has identified as one of the front-runners for the job. 

My apologies for not providing this clarity in my original post.

Thanks again!

D/1900 

RickMeasham's picture

G'day D/1900

I too have a professional blog (you'll see the link in the footer. Have a look around!). I only put content on there that I would like a potential employer to read. (On my personal blog I only post content I'd be comfortable with a potential employer reading (same for Facebook and Twitter)).

However, if I was to apply for a position somewhere, I wouldn't expect them to find either, or even to follow a link I gave them.

Instead, I put my professional self out there so people can learn from what I've learned. It's more likely, in my opinion, for someone to find my blog and then approach me with an opportunity -- just the same as with my LinkedIn profile.

If the reason for your blog is to complement your resume, I think you'll continue to be disappointed.

Cheers!
Rick Measham

________________________________
Read my blog: Geek Herding - Explorations in the art of leading IT professionals

TomW's picture

D1900,

you can clarify the situation all you want, the advice doesn't change. The only time a recruiter should be expected to even look at your blog is if your a journalist and they want samples of how you write.