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BLUF: My friend (really), a retail store manager for a mid-sized specialty store was unexpectedly asked to resign his position. His choices: give 45 days notice and leave with a letter of recommendation or get managed out in the next 45 days. What to do? I'd love to hear the thoughts of the brilliant M-T forum community.

There are 20+ stores in his region and all have year over sales down 5-9%. His store is down 12%. His manager has only recently started talking about his sales performance but has not given him any feedback or coaching. Up until very recently, the company has sent him to stores in other states to help turn around the ones that are new or struggling.

My friend was totally caught off guard by the ultimatum posed by his manager and asked for a day to consider his options.

My advice? Given the facts he provided, I told him he should not give his notice of resignation. In my mind, his employer wants him to resign because they've not taken the right steps to manage him and now want him out. I suggested, instead, that he decline the offer to resign and focus on getting another job. He is afraid of what "being fired" will do to his job hunt.

Anyone out there want to give their opinion?

kmadams88's picture

Retail is business is very tough these days. Job elimination is a likely scenario over the next 12 months. I would advise to take the 45 days + letter of recommendations and move forward. Maybe your friend could ask for 60 or 75 days notice.

jhack's picture

Whatever else he calls it, he's being laid off. It's tough, but he should swallow his pride and take the letter of recommendation.

They may be planning to shut the store - so it may not be about him.

Are there any other caveats here (ie, severance?)

John

AManagerTool's picture

Having your boss gunning for you is not fun. Resign with grace and his blessings. Prior to that...talk to a lawyer....LOL....just kidding.

sklosky's picture

My 2 cents.

May be worth trying a salvage operation. Draw up a "get well" plan. Pitch it to the manager. Your friend has to acknowledge the tough market all retailers are facing today during the pitch.

If this doesn't work, get that resume and network going. :)

Good luck,
Steve

HMac's picture

But if the likelihood of successful salvage is low, take the 45 days and the note - so your friend can devote 100% to job search.

If at bottom, your friend thinks this is a losing proposition, he'd be smarter to take the 45 days and the note. Especially if the chain of stores is doing badly - people in the industry will know it's about the business and not about him...

-Hugh

FlatFeeKing's picture

Yeah , good point from HMac.

MattJBeckwith's picture

Thank you all so very much. This board has such great members; I appreciate the quick response!

My friend (really, it's not me) decided to give 30 days notice and is holding his head up while he intensifies his job search efforts.

Thanks again.

HMac's picture

Dave - if you haven't already, tell your friend (see? I believe you...) about M-T - and the value of the Interviewing Series.

-Hugh

MattJBeckwith's picture

Hugh, my friend has been hearing about M-T for years now. Sadly, I've been unsuccessful in convincing him to get the interviewing series.

I've not worked in retail in many, many years but I absolutely believe the interviewing series even works for retail managers.

US41's picture

[quote="DaveTehre"]BLUF: My friend (really), a retail store manager for a mid-sized specialty store was unexpectedly asked to resign his position. His choices: give 45 days notice and leave with a letter of recommendation or get managed out in the next 45 days. What to do? [/quote]

Your friend has no options. He's leaving in 45 days due to a 12% drop in performance. It's over.

No get well plan is going to work. He's fired already. This was not a threat or a boundary-setting exercise. This is a timeline to termination. "We're all done here, folks. Move along."

Tell him to take the package, be a professional, prepare a transition, ask humbly how he can help boost the success of his follower, and leave on good terms.

MattJBeckwith's picture

Follow up.

He gave his letter of resignation and agreed to leave in 30 days.

Even though I was very skeptical about it, his district manager, as promised, gave him a glowing letter of recommendation. I can't get over that part: seems a bit risky to force him out and then write him such a positive note.

It sounds like this happens in retail. In all of my years managing in call centers I have never seen anything like this.

Thanks again everyone!