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Hi Guys, i am a future manager, 12 months out of my degree (business) and have worked in hospitality during this time, i have recently begun working with a Voip telephone provider.

The job i applied for was in sales which included a 3 month probationary period in customer service, i have relocated for this role and am not entirely happy. In this 3 month period which is almost up, the organisation has gone through some staff changes and hence my role has been discarded.

Coming up to my 3 month review i need to decide what i want to happen going forward, so i can convey this to management, Any ideas to what i should be doing to most benefit my career?

sorry for the long post

ramiska's picture

Too many variables.

Is it that you are unhappy with the relocation? Life outside of work comes first.

Is there chance for advancement considering the elimination of your role? The three months may be the end.

How about looking for a management position within the hospitality industry?

Mark's picture

Dom-

I'd love to know more information.

What don't you like? What do you want to do? Are you in danger of losing your job because of the role going away? Do you need to find another job there? How much does the relocation affect things? What KIND of customer service role is it? Are you aware of the business challenges in the VoiP world?

Mark

domobrien's picture

Thanks for the quick replys guys.

This job was a stepping stone to get some real world experience, and hence i had to relocate to sydney about 2 hours from home to get this experience. (no-one wants a graduate with no experience)

Whilst i am not in danger of losing my job, i may be stuck in the C.S role for some time longer. It is inbound call centre work.

Th company has changed focus and has also bought the distribution rights to TiVo Australia.

My question is really, if i have to stay in customer service for longer and possibly wait for a promotion is this a better career move, or should i be looking at something else.

I am a little homesick but if i was enjoying work than i guess i would be more happy

To sum up, with a marketing/management business degree, is customer service going to get me the experience to score a better job next time

jhack's picture

You seek "a better job". Mark's question, "What do you want to do?" goes to the heart of the matter. It's easy to be dissatisfied with one's situation - it's another to clearly define where one would rather be. Or to find the gold in one's current situation...

Do you want to do marketing? Sales? Operations? Don't know? Look for how you can make a real contribution. Bring energy and enthusiasm to your work. Network internally - go to lunch with folks in other groups (accounting, marketing, etc). Get to know what their jobs are like. You don't need to hide the fact that you'd like to understand the business from end to end. Use this job to get the experience you said you wanted from it originally.

You might just find something that really excites you.

BTW, I love my TiVo dearly, and would find it gratifying to work in a firm that was part of their network!

John

Mark's picture

Based on what you've shared, 12 months is likely too early to tell.

That said, I always encourage everyone who has twinges to get their resume together and start building their network, and opening your reticular activating system to other opportunities.

Mark

tcomeau's picture

[quote="mahorstman"]... opening your reticular activating system to other opportunities.
[/quote]

Okay, that's funny. I wonder how many MT readers have enough Latin (or interest in etymology) to get the pun? There's a weak pun in the neurobiological sense, too, if you equate "opening" with arousal.

tc>

Mark's picture

Tom-

Dude, you are WAY too smart. (I mean, aren't you a rocket scientist?)

It wasn't a pun. :lol: The reticular activating system is the part of our brains that (this is not all it does, I'm fairly sure) screens information for us.

I wlll tell a story some time about MY reticular activating system and dentist's offices - silly, but powerful.

Think of the RAS as the scientific way of saying, "that which you are seeking is seeking you," or, "Tell your brain to pay attention to something new, and you'll be amazed what you've been missing all around you," or, "when the student is ready the teacher appears."

You know you write too much when you make a pun you are unaware of.

Happy new year all,

Mark

tcomeau's picture

[quote="mahorstman"]
... (I mean, aren't you a rocket scientist?)

It wasn't a pun. :lol: The reticular activating system is the part of our brains that (this is not all it does, I'm fairly sure) screens information for us.
[/quote]

Mark, you're just so erudite that you're effortlessly punny. :D :D :roll:

Yes, the neurobiological pun is that the RAS is the arousal center, so "opening your RAS" pun is about arousing your arousal. But "reticular"'s Latin root is reticulum, or "little net" which was the networking pun.

And no, I'm not a rocket scientist myself, but I know several. But a common comment around the Institute is "That's not rocket science. Which is too bad, because we're pretty good at rocket science."

tc>

ramiska's picture

So you're somewhere between brain science and rocket surgery, then? :lol:

tcomeau's picture

[quote="ramiska"]So you're somewhere between brain science and rocket surgery, then? :lol:[/quote]

Something like that. I know a guy who used to do rocket surgery. He was a tech for the US Air Force who did maintenance and troubleshooting on the Minuteman missile guidance systems. I was never clear if he was more concerned about the 70,000 pounds of solid rocket fuel below him, or the 50 kiloton nuclear warhead above him.

tc>

ramiska's picture

Built by the lowest bidder?

tcomeau's picture

[quote="ramiska"]Built by the lowest bidder?[/quote]
Well, there's less of that than most people realize.

Very few contractors can qualify for certain types of government contract. That's particularly true for classified work, where you can't even find out there's work to bid on unless you're already on the inside.

Even for a lot of the open work, you can't qualify to bid unless you've done something similar. NASA has recently enshrined this principle in the AO for certain kinds of "small" mission: You can't propose unless you've been a deputy PI or program manager on a previous similar mission.

Then again, while they cost seven million dollars a launcher, when you use them their value drops to zero. Or I guess something rather less than zero.

tc>

Mark's picture

The lowest bidder joke is really pretty offensive, folks. Don't be fooled by the media and Congress (some of whom have been my clients), who are aware that drama and conflict are what sell ads. The vast majority of work the government does is good and fair and ethical and reasonably priced.

Mark

MattJBeckwith's picture

[quote="tcomeau"]Mark, you're just so erudite that you're effortlessly punny. :D :D :roll:

Yes, the neurobiological pun is that the RAS is the arousal center, so "opening your RAS" pun is about arousing your arousal. But "reticular"'s Latin root is reticulum, or "little net" which was the networking pun.[/quote]
Wow, I had to google about every other word of this entire thread just to keep up.

I laughed a lot, and googled a lot.

Thanks for the late night smile, gentlemen.
:-)

ramiska's picture

[quote]The lowest bidder joke is really pretty offensive, folks. [/quote]

Gracefully withdrawn.

Thank you, Mark, for keeping us clean and honest.

I apologize to the forum for speaking before thinking. :oops:

Mark's picture

Make that gentlemAn.

Tom's the funny one in this thread!

Stand Up Rocket Scientist - new career field, dude.

My daughter is an ME grad from Tulane, and is looking for just the right job in building rockets. (San Antonio conference attendees met her). I am thinking of having a tee-shirt made that says:

My daughter is a rocket scientist.

Mark

Mark's picture

Beautifully done, Ramiska!

Mark