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Though the M-T community has now lived through the trials and tribulations of the pronunciation of the word "koan" :wink:, some may still have some residual questions regarding the ever-challenging topic of grammar (I certainly do).

Obviously written and verbal communication is critical to the professional and using proper grammar may provide an edge for those who do use it over those who don't. With that in mind, I'm including a link to a CNN.com article I stumbled across today for a podcast series from "Grammar Girl". Each cast is short (all are less than 10 minutes), sweet and to the point and provide answers to commonly asked and/or confused questions on english grammar (lie vs. lay, commas, colons, who/whom etc.). Perhaps some for whom english is a second language may also find the casts of particular use for what may be considered "advanced" instruction (english is my native languange and I'm learning a ton from the casts! :shock: )

Anyway, I hope some find this useful:
[url]http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/internet/01/22/grammar.girl/index.html[/url]

Also, here's the link to Grammar Girls web site as well as other "tips" sites that may be of interest to the M-T community.
[url]http://www.qdnow.com/[/url]

The podcasts can be found on iTunes under "Language Courses" or from the Grammar Girl web site.

Al

ctomasi's picture

Thank you Al! I have been looking for something like this!

peloton's picture

Chuck,

Very glad to help in this small way.

Al

juliahhavener's picture

I was at a court reporting convention with my mother late last year. It was fabulous to be in a room full of people who got the punctuation jokes...

Not too long afterwards, my partner saw [url=http://www.amazon.com/Eats-Shoots-Leaves-Tolerance-Punctuation/dp/159240..., Shoots & Leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation[/url] and had to bring it home for me. When you grow up listening to dictation and editing court transcripts, you learn very quickly the power of a comma and amused by the oddest things in text.

One more grammatical reference (complete with stick-on commas!) that may make your life easier.

ctomasi's picture

I have finished listening to the entire collection of Grammar Girl podcasts. Good stuff! I considered myself above average at grammar, but I still got a good dose of new knowledge.

This is now one of my favorite podcasts. It is short, direct, and educational!

I am compiling a list of topics I would love to hear Grammar Girl cover!

Thanks again!

MattJBeckwith's picture

I sent Chuck a PM before I noticed this thread congratulating him on his new fame (even though he's a already a bit of a celebrity).

For those that didn't hear it, Chuck was actually heard on Grammar Girl's recent 'cast on the subject of "myself". That was a great example e-mail by the way Chuck.

Shawn's picture

I've been working my way through the Grammar Girl podcasts. Good info in bite sized chunks, with a very clear and pleasant delivery.

Chuck, great question on the "myself" issue. That particular 'cast was one of the more useful for me.

cowie165's picture

Just wanted to chime in with another vote for Grammar Girl.

For the skeptics, please go ahead and download a few. You'll be surprised. It's another great resource.

seisho's picture

I'm very glad to see the Grammer Girl podcast spreading widely: I listen to them biking to and from work, and I find the style to be very helpful, sometimes quite funny, and always focused on smart modern English.

Mark's picture

I've subscribed. I suspect I'll like it. Good writing is... sweet.

Bad writing is...ubiquitous.

Mark