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I know that specifics are usually needed but I was hoping to hear from some folks on some common bits of feedback that you give. I play alot of this in my head before, during and after O3's and just being in the office with my team but what I usually come up with is something like this:

Can I give you some feedback?

Yes.

When you dont hit the required number of appts for the week it appears that you arent concerned about improving your prospecting skills. What can you do differently for next week?

Thats about the only one I use (I havent been giving feedback very long, thanks MT!)...can we add on to this thread with some of your examples?

Thanks!

rwwh's picture

There are two things that are making this more difficult than it needs to be:

* You are waiting for the O3 to give feedback. This is charging up the atmosphere.
* You are not training yourself on positive feedback

Then again, I am an early trainee myself. Ask me again after the Amsterdam conference.

US41's picture

[quote="yahtzee"]Thats about the only one I use[/quote]

If you only use one feedback, make it positive. Smother everyone in positive feedback for 90 days. Find what is good in the world and give feedback for it. Did they do ANYTHING AT ALL RIGHT? Most managers don't even look to see. Surely they did something right. Did they dress appropriately? Did they do their hair nice? Did they park their car in the right spot? Did they get to work on time?

Find something they did right and drop the feedback on that behavior. Do it until you are comfortable. Unless of course you want people to hear the sound of their heartbeat in their ears every time your name shows up on their phones or you turn a corner and wave for them to come over.

WillDuke's picture

Lots of positive feedback can definitely grease the wheels. Watch especially closely for when they are doing a good job on the things you need them to do a good job on. :)

Steve, can I give you some feedback? When you get one of your appointmentss on Monday it really helps fire up the team. Thanks.

Steve, can I give you some feedback? When you get 2 appointments in 1 day it really raises the bar around here. Great job.

Steve, can I give you some feedback? When you came in this morning and sat right down and started making calls I get that you're interested in success. Way to go.

Steve, can I give you some feedback? When you maintain a positive attitude with prospects on the phone it reflects well on you and the whole company. Thank you.

Steve, can I give you some feedback? When you follow the steps of our program like you just did I know you're going to be successful. Good job!

It doesn't take long for Steve to get that you're paying attention. He has a clear understanding of what you want him to do. And hopefully, as he does it, his success and earnings go up. Steve's going to be a happy camper.

yahtzee's picture

[quote="WillDuke"]Lots of positive feedback can definitely grease the wheels. Watch especially closely for when they are doing a good job on the things you need them to do a good job on. :)

Steve, can I give you some feedback? When you get one of your appointmentss on Monday it really helps fire up the team. Thanks.

Steve, can I give you some feedback? When you get 2 appointments in 1 day it really raises the bar around here. Great job.

Steve, can I give you some feedback? When you came in this morning and sat right down and started making calls I get that you're interested in success. Way to go.

Steve, can I give you some feedback? When you maintain a positive attitude with prospects on the phone it reflects well on you and the whole company. Thank you.

Steve, can I give you some feedback? When you follow the steps of our program like you just did I know you're going to be successful. Good job!

It doesn't take long for Steve to get that you're paying attention. He has a clear understanding of what you want him to do. And hopefully, as he does it, his success and earnings go up. Steve's going to be a happy camper.[/quote]
Right on, Will!! Exactly the types of examples I was looking for....Thanks!

Peter.westley's picture

Will,

Excellent and creative examples. I sympathise with yahtzee on having difficulty in coming up with enough different ways to express simple feedback like that.

Thanks.

yahtzee's picture

[quote="WillDuke"]Lots of positive feedback can definitely grease the wheels. Watch especially closely for when they are doing a good job on the things you need them to do a good job on. :)

Steve, can I give you some feedback? When you get one of your appointmentss on Monday it really helps fire up the team. Thanks.

Steve, can I give you some feedback? When you get 2 appointments in 1 day it really raises the bar around here. Great job.

Steve, can I give you some feedback? When you came in this morning and sat right down and started making calls I get that you're interested in success. Way to go.

Steve, can I give you some feedback? When you maintain a positive attitude with prospects on the phone it reflects well on you and the whole company. Thank you.

Steve, can I give you some feedback? When you follow the steps of our program like you just did I know you're going to be successful. Good job!

It doesn't take long for Steve to get that you're paying attention. He has a clear understanding of what you want him to do. And hopefully, as he does it, his success and earnings go up. Steve's going to be a happy camper.[/quote]

What about a few examples of some adjusting feedback? "When you are late 4 times this week.........

or

When you continue to not to update our required SFA tool.........

WillDuke's picture

Well, don't forget that positive feedback comes first. Not just to get you and them used to the model and relaxed about it, but also so they know what behavior you DO want. I suspect we've all worked for someone who only tells you what they DON'T want you to do. Pin the tail on the Donkey for the right things to do is a lousy way to manage. :) Tell them what you DO want first, then adjust them when they stray.

So, after LOTS of positive feedback, so people know what to do, you can move to adjusting feedback. I think adjusting feedback relies even more heavily on being appropriately tailored to people's communication habits - DiSC. You're asking someone to change. Accordingly the more you appeal to their personal preferences, the more likely that change will take place. (Review casts on feedback and DiSC.)

So here goes:

Steve's a D
Steve, can I give you some feedback? When you come in to work and watch YouTube for an hour first thing you're not doing your job. What can you do differently next time?

Steve's an I
Steve, can I give you some feedback? When you come in to work and watch YouTube for an hour first thing people notice and think you're not doing your job. You'll get the reputation of being lazy. What can you do differently next time?

Steve's an S
Steve, can I give you some feedback? When you come in to work and watch YouTube for an hour first thing your teammates notice. It makes them uncomfortable knowing that you're not pulling your weight and it brings down the team. What can you do differently next time?

Steve's a C
Steve, can I give you some feedback? When you come in to work and watch YouTube for an hour first thing it makes me think you're not committed to your job. It makes me think you don't understand how things work here. What do you think you can do differently next time?

---------------------

So those aren't perfect, and I'm okay with that. I remember reading some feedback Mark wrote here in the forums and being struck with how brilliant it was. I was daunted by my inability to make something so perfect. Since then I have learned a couple things.

1. Don't let perfect be the enemy of good.
2. Feedback is like breathing. If you're doing enough of it, it won't matter if you stumble a little. It's just another chip in the bag.

BJ_Marshall's picture

If you do stumble, treat it as a learning experience. There's some phrase (I forget now) about how good judgment comes from experience, which in turn comes from bad judgment.

I suggest noticing their nonverbal language. Seeing the nonverbal language of my directs has really helped me refine my feedback so I stumble less. I remember giving some adjusting feedback to a High-S and treating him like a High-D. It came off way too terse, and I could see it immediately in his nonverbal communication. But still it wasn't a big deal; there's no use crying over one spilled chip.

Meanwhile, I gave some adjusting feedback to a High-I in just the right way. I swear, her face lit up like I was giving her positive feedback!

I sincerely applaud your efforts!
BJ