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I am fairly new to MT and love it. I registered and downloaded everything, have listened to the Basics and am caught up to April 06.

My question is now that I have the basics covered, would I be best served to continue in chronological order and eventually catch up or to listen to the current podcasts and then try to catch up on the older ones?

Thanks in advance for your input!

jhack's picture

Linda,

I kept a list and chose the most interesting and relevant first, checking off each one after I listened to it.

You could look at the categorizations Mike set up. http://www.manager-tools.com/podcasts-by-category/

I got through them all after a while.

John

juliahhavener's picture

Linda,

If you've done the basics, start looking for areas that you feel are important to you.

I actually found Manager Tools when I was looking for a meeting agenda template. I was set to facilitate a team meeting and wanted to do it well. I found the MT podcast for meetings and...well, I was hooked. Now I listen to them as they came out, but initially I listened to the items I thought would bring me the most immediate value. I go back and listen to those items pretty frequently.

tlhausmann's picture

I was introduced to Manager Tools about a year ago. I chose to listen chronologically and was able to "catch up" by listing to MT while doing yard work, exercising, or during long drives.

It is by no means imperative to listen chronologically. However, Mark and Mike introduce vocabulary and metaphors that build over time. I have found the common vocabulary of MT listeners a powerful facilitator for effective communications--face to face at Meet Ups and in the forums.

asteriskrntt1's picture

With M&M having such a backlog of podcast topics, I am guessing they release what they release in the order they release it for a reason.

I listened to them in order just because it never occured to me to listen to them out of order, :oops: which is pretty funny considering how out of the box a thinker I am.

Mark's picture

Do the basics, and then order them based on your interest. Every quarter, re-order those you have left based on new priorities.

We have tried to make each timeless, but there are some that build on others, and sometimes the connections aren't totally obvious...but I don't believe that matters.

I think the categories would help - no sense in listening to one when there are three (separated by a year or two) that would be good in a row.

We do have a rationale for publishing, and it's private and will remain so, out of deference to more forces than I care to mention.

Mark