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Many companies have policies that call for employees without identification to be escorted. At my company, this has been tested at times when executives from partner companies come on site and officially require escorts. When an employee is seperated and the identification taken, it is common for people to be escorted out.

Having experienced an exit where an employee, who had given notice, refused to make eye contact or shake hands. I started wondering if there wasn't something I should have done better. It was brought to my attention that although people dealing with vendors would understand the escort out, typically it is a strong sign of distrust and humiliating - especially in situations of retirement or when notice was given in advance.

I'm planning to explain the exit interview process before the exit interview next time; hoping that this will ensure the employee is prepared and mitigate surprise.

What do more seasoned professionals feel on the topic?

lou's picture

I think you're on the right path. But possibly the best thing you could do (an this is in one of the podcasts) is to walk them out yourself (or have their manager walk them out if that's not you). It turns it from a security escort because you don't trust them, into a way to continue pleasant conversation until they reach the door (and I'd walk them back to their car if it's just outside). Otherwise you're setting up a very strange wall - I trusted you with key company assets two weeks ago, now I don't trust you to walk through the hall without stealing something.

Mark's picture

I am not sure I completely understand the question, but I think you're asking if I would walk someone out after an exit interview.

Good Lord NO. I think we're missing the point here. In order to leave a company, there's firing, layoffs, or resigning. Exit interviews are ONLY GOOD for resignations. If you terminated me or laid me off, you're NOT going to get good data from me in an exit interview.

When I've talked before about escorting someone out, it wasn't after an exit interview.

I'm not a big fan of exit interviews anyway...

Now...is that helpful? Worried that I missed your point.

Mark

robers97's picture

Mark,

It looks like "exit interview" caught your attention but not the core consideration. In the post I used "exit interview" to define the meeting to give the final paycheck, collect company identification, and in some cases cell phones, company credit cards, etc. After this is done, the employee doesn't have the any means of badging through doors and, as someone without identification, is supposed to be escorted by policy.

Not to say all policies are good policies, but the circumstances above suggest that either the policy should be changed or that I need to find a way to do this respectfully. I was hoping to solicit ideas on how this might be done.

bflynn's picture

[quote="robers97"]Mark,

It looks like "exit interview" caught your attention but not the core consideration. In the post I used "exit interview" to define the meeting to give the final paycheck, collect company identification, and in some cases cell phones, company credit cards, etc. After this is done, the employee doesn't have the any means of badging through doors and, as someone without identification, is supposed to be escorted by policy.

Not to say all policies are good policies, but the circumstances above suggest that either the policy should be changed or that I need to find a way to do this respectfully. I was hoping to solicit ideas on how this might be done.[/quote]

Some suggestion to avoid the "escorted out" stigma.

- if possible, conduct that last interview in a space very close to the door. You still have to escort them out, but the walk is much shorter.
- I know that many HR departments have a separate outside entrance. If yours does, conduct the last interview at HR, then let the employee leave on their own. Them walking to HR isn't the same as them being walked out.
- Conduct the interview and mention that you'll need the badge prior to their leaving, but don't take the badge yet. When the employee is ready to leave, ask them to call and meet them at the door to collect the badge. Yes, you're running the risk of someone forgetting, but you have their contact information at home, right?

Brian

Mark's picture

You know, under the circumstances, I don't think you need to be all that worried about this. I can understand the need for security policies, and this is one situation where they create some discomfort.

It's not perfect, but it's reality.

Mark