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Since the delegation is framed as a request, I assume it must be expected that a delegation might be declined. Does the manager accept that and just move on? Raise it another time or let it go?

Assume that one follows the model, heard the concerns and then addressed them in the details...but that didn't turn a no into a yes.

This may not be an issue but after analyzing my top focus areas, this is something I want to get rid of and have someone else take on. Worst case is I am still doing it - not terrible outcome. But I am wondering if there is some behavioral recommendations out there about this.

Michael

Scgoldie's picture

I'll qualify this by saying a) I'm only 24, a manager with 2 years and b) I'm quite high on the D of DISC.

I had this not long ago.  For context, I'm a restaurant manager, I had to attend a disciplinary and so I needed my supervisor to close the business.

I got resistance, and after hearing her out and addressing her concerns, I relied on my role power.

I said something akin to, "Ok, we're not going to agree on this, but delegation is part of my job and I am asking you to do this.  When you push back, it makes me question whether you want to stay in your supervisor role, or if we need to consider whether to move you elsewhere.  We can discuss that later, but I am now instructing you to do this, and that is the end of the discussion for now"

I don't know if that helps.  I never needed to discuss her role, as now, delegation isn't' an issue.  Best long-term solution, I don't know, but it was effective in stopping this particular direct pushing back on delegation.

 

Hope my limited experience is helpful

tiomikel's picture

SCGOLDIE - I'm sure role power can work. And, in your case resolve the matter long term.I am also High D and not opposed to this. But I am suspicious of my High D tendencies and wonder of others have non-role power answers.

And, if role power is the answer - why do we ask?

Thanks for your input and sharing your experience.

Michael

thebeezer's picture

http://www.manager-tools.com/2011/05/over-assigning-and-delegating-work-part-1

This cast talks about how to deal with resistance to delegation. If you've already listened to this and tried this model, can you describe a specific situation to make it easier to discuss specifics?

 

tiomikel's picture

I have listened to that cast but did not remember specifics about resistance to delegation. Will review and if I remain unclear will post on forum. Thanks for the lead.

Michael

smorison's picture

hey buddy,

Management is fun, and you always end up with someone pulling your chain for some reason or another. Did you inquire as to why she didn't want to do it? there could have been a valid personal commitment that she had to fulfill.

did you really say?

"Ok, we're not going to agree on this, but delegation is part of my job and I am asking you to do this.  When you push back, it makes me question whether you want to stay in your supervisor role, or if we need to consider whether to move you elsewhere.  We can discuss that later, but I am now instructing you to do this, and that is the end of the discussion for now"

If so, its pretty heavy handed for the situation and likely to cause you more problems moving forward. If the situation comes up again be a bit nicer.

You might want to read 7 habits, "seek first to understand, then to be understood" could well have resolved this without escalation in tempers..

Cheers and good luck :)

Stephen

 

DISC: 7511

dan west's picture

Hi Michael,

I give my team the option of accepting a delegation. I usually have a good sense of who is willing to accept what based on one on ones, but I'll occasionally be surprised. I think there are a few reasonable explanations. In some cases, I'll also explain why the delegation is good for them. If I notice someone declines a few delegations in a row, then it's a signal that they are either unwilling or unable to grow. In the long run, that means opportunities that could have gone to them will now be redirected elsewhere. 

-Dan

tiomikel's picture

Just participated in the conference and Mark and Dani were pretty clear that one does not ask unless one is willing to accept the answer - yes or no. Therefore it appears that I could be ready to give a delegation and it may be declined.

My issue is what do I do now with the responsibility. Am I forced into keeping it because I don't have someone taking it on? Someone asked for specifics. I'll provide two.

After, I need your help and why I chose  you....

1-Would you be willing to handle all the logistics of my travel and our off site events? NO-I've already got too much on my plate. [Follow up with asking him to prioritize his responsibilities and come back with what he can drop...this meeting has yet to happen but he did communicate that there are things he doesn't want to take off his plate because he has strengths in those areas and prefers spending time on them]

2-Would you be willing to run our team meetings? NO- That's something I'm just not interested in.

Michael

tiomikel's picture

Must of made error in duplicating post. Don't know how to delete it so I'll amend it with this apology.

Michael

preeti134's picture

 Hi this sounded a bit rude to me..I am looking for something polite and straight forward

Dani Martin's picture

Hi Michael -- It sounds like you've been moving forward with implementing the Trinity since the conference! Good job! This is a great question and it's one we hear often.

When a direct declines delegation, your options are to keep it or delegate it to someone else. And with a direct who says no quickly, you can follow up your acceptance of their "no" with an explanation of the consequences. It might sound like "That's fine. You can say no. And you should know that I'm either going to keep doing it or ask someone else - one of your peers. And you should also know this reflects on your willingness to grow. Everyone's jobs are changing all the time and declining delegation comes across as being unwilling to grow."

I hope this helps, Michael! Thanks for coming to our conference and following up on the forums.

Best,
Dani