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Hello all,

I am looking for guindance on how to communicate a near-miss to a group. The situation is a peice of equipment was moved, but not plugged back in. The equipment's battery could have been affected to the point that it may have not functioned as intended the next time it was used and could have caused a test to be invalidated.

In this situation, I don't know who moved it, it could be someone of the technical staff or peers of mine in the professional staff. It's pretty big so it would have taken at least two people.

I want to communicate to all involved with the equipment that the problem was found and remedied (I plugged it back in when i found it), but for everyone to be aware that it happened so that it will not happen again.

Is the following communication appropriate or is there a better way? (Words have been generalized as to not release potential client information)

"The (specific equipment) was found disconnected. I have reconnected it.

I know that we are having to move a lot of (general equipment) right now, and I want to make sure that it is being plugged back in when moved for any length of time to avoid any potential invalid tests."

Thanks in advance!

MK

Helen C's picture

Hi MK,

An effective tool we use in my work place is a Safety Share at the beginning of each meeting.  

The chair or contributor describes the incident as to what happened, what the result was or what the result could have been and then either explains the correct process or opens the floor for discussion (time permitting).

Something like:

A piece of equipment (be specific if they know what the machine is called) was moved, but not plugged back in.  By not plugging it in, the battery could have been affected to the point that it may have not functioned as intended the next time it was used and could have caused a test to be invalidated.

The problem was found and remedied however the situation could have been serious by impacting on  xyz.

Then you can provide suggestion on how to check in the future.

I hope this helps.  It doesn't single out anyone or blame or shame but the whole group is aware of the potential hazard so it doesn't happen again.

Helen C