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Hi,

This is not planned to be a discussion about the best task tool but a question how to keep track of the multiple deliverables from my subordinates for various projects.

And I am a hi "I" which makes following up things not my favorite. But I guess I am not getting paid for what I like but for what is necessary. So I need to solve the following issue for me:

We have multiple projects (as everyone) with multiple not direct subordinates that are working remote.

And when the project team and I discuss the deliverables for a project, then normally I take notes for this meeting eg on my paper notebook, but it could happen to be also somewhere else: OneNote, emails, notes, ...
As the day goes by and we have more meetings about other projects, there are many notes scattered all over the place (paper notebook, OneNote, emails,...).

Any idea how I could organize myself to keep track of things?

I would like to get some sort of one "inbox" where I have things together to make following up easier.

Thanks for your ideas.

Regards,
Christopher

meliorate1's picture

Also a high i, I am not perfect at this but have found 3 things to help me. 1- all my notes in one note or evernote so can find from anywhere. 2- master spreadshhet where I track key deliverables of my team members, etc. 3-summarize at end of meeting which prompts me to capture it.

I fall off the wagon ofter but try to get back on quickly!

jrb3's picture

I take a cue from David Allen's "Getting Things Done".  I have 'as many inboxes as I need, and as few as I can'.  I also have daily time on-calendar to process them all and incorporate their items into "my system".  (cf "The One Thing" book's emphasis on time-blocking)

Most of my projects and project portfolios have been small enough that a spreadsheet workbook sufficed for tracking current status.  And the processing taking 5-10 minutes each morning, as part of processing all my inboxes.

My high-I friends really found it helpful dedicating the time-blocks for processing notes.  They knew they'd get to it -- though many did it last-minute anyway!  Those last I keep encouraging them to start the day with processing and planning, though they're (to my mind) strangely reluctant to try that experiment.  (Leading me to sigh 'you do you, dude' at them.)