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Okay, it's that time of year again. After listening to the performance review podcasts yet again, I dumbly have forgotten what SEER actually stands for. Can someone please spell it out for this dopey manager!

Tom

KCSmith's picture

Tom,

SEER = Summary, Example, Elaboration, Result

It comes from the "How to Prepare for Your Review. The link to the transcript is below.

www.manager-tools.com/podcasts/your_review/How_To_Prepare_For_Your_Revie...

P.S. ~ We're all a little dopey! Don't worry about it!

KC

Mark's picture

- SEER Technique - This takes more room, and is probably better for more important points. I admit I try to use this one first, and if I can't fit it, I use the 2 step method below. SEER stands for Summarize, Elaborate, Example, Restate. Bob is my best customer service rep. he consistently exceeds every standard. He recently saved a difficult call after three other reps had failed. He's an example we ought to put on training videos."

- Sum-Ex Method - In one sentence, summarize the behavior or performance, and then in the second give an example. Two sentences, no more. Bob is my best cus service rep. Recently he saved a difficult call despite 3 other reps not being able to."

In both techniques, avoid commas. The less commas you use in reviews, the less others will misunderstand, and the more likely they will pass muster with the org/HR. GOOD writers HATE commas. Short is better.

tplummer's picture

Thanks. Luckily or unluckily depending on how you look at it, we have unlimited room to write our reviews. So SEER for me. But, I'm going to drastically change my style this year to the SEER method. I usually write 3 or 4 paragraphs for strengths and another 3-4 for development needs. In this I weave a story. I write it like I would speak it but in the 3rd person which is odd. No more! I'm going to the more direct and fact based SEER method. I think it will really help. The story comes during the review. I think if it sort of like the powerpoint netcast. A few key bullets simply stated. The narrative comes from the presenter.

Mark's picture

YES! The story happens during delivery.

Mark