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I am getting into the final rounds of interviewing with two companies. Should I tell each that I am interviewing with another company, i.e. full disclosure? I'm not trying to leverage one over the other. I just don't want it to be a surprise if I happen to get offers from both and then suddenly bring this up.

And, neither have asked if I am interviewing with other companies.

harnod's picture

If you get two offers,  simpky choose the best for you. 

1. They are interviewing other candidates

2. You cannot be sure that they will not take the information as a leverage,  no regard to your best intentions

3. Why would you tell them in the first place?

 

When you get hired,  tell them you picked them among competing offers,  it will generate good will in your beginning.

 

Good luck at getting all the offers you want.

Matej

harnod's picture

If you get two offers,  simpky choose the best for you. 

1. They are interviewing other candidates

2. You cannot be sure that they will not take the information as a leverage,  no regard to your best intentions

3. Why would you tell them in the first place?

 

When you get hired,  tell them you picked them among competing offers,  it will generate good will in your beginning.

 

Good luck at getting all the offers you want.

Matej

tokyotony's picture

My thinking here is that it is about good-will in the market. If one selects me and I suddenly tell them that I have another offer and going with them, wouldn't that leave a bad taste in their mouths, especially if they could be a possible company I could work for in the future?

katehorstman's picture

I agree completely with harnod. Why would you tell them? Even after they offer you, there is no reason to divulge that you have another offer. It doesn’t have any relevance to their offer unless you are going to try to use one to get something out of the other. Which we do NOT advise. There is no reason to divulge why you are declining. In fact, no matter your reasons, you decline an offer the same way: “I am declining your offer.” You don’t need to justify your decision, or give a long list of reason why you are declining. If you do so, in fact, the hiring manager tends to choose one to use to persuade you. If you have chosen, and are comfortable in your choice, persuasion is moot. You don’t want to have to discuss or debate the offers with the hiring manager.

 

 I’ve included the links for our casts on offers below. I think these might help.

Good luck!

Kate

https://www.manager-tools.com/2012/01/declining-offer

https://www.manager-tools.com/2013/01/how-not-accept-offer-chapter-1-playing-two-offers-against-each-other

https://www.manager-tools.com/2012/11/accepting-offer

tokyotony's picture

Kate,

Thanks for reminding me of the declingin offer podcast. I did listen to that before and will re-listen to it and download the shownotes. I should have done a search on that...apologies.

I guess the thing is is thia.... I would feel it a bit "cold" to simply give a "I'm declining" simple answer. I feel like I've built up a nice relationship with the hiring manager, and she has been rather open with me about the other candidates and where I stand.

Hmmm.

Tony

tokyotony's picture

I'm not planning on playing the offers off each other. Not my style.

Tony